Continuous exercise to renew the strength and mobility of the knee is very important for complete recovery after arthroscopic surgery. Your orthopedic surgeon or physiotherapist may recommend that you practice for approximately 20-30 minutes 2 or 3 times a day. They can offer a set of exercises after arthroscopy for recovery, shown below. They will also advise you to participate in the walk program. A set of exercises after arthroscopy

Initially, you will experience swelling and discomfort in the knee for several days after surgery. You will most likely be given a prescription for painkillers and an anti-inflammatory drug to relieve these symptoms.

Read this also:

Arthroscopy exercises

Arthroscopy is a common surgical procedure in which a joint is scanned by a small camera through an incision to repair the damage. The knee is the largest and most complex joint in the human body. The knee is the largest and most complex joint in the human body, since it is such an integral part of the human movement, the knee is subject to many different types of injuries. Arthroscopy removes or restores cartilage, ligaments and bones, followed by physiotherapy.

Gravity resistance exercise describes any physical activity in which the part of the body in question is carrying weight against gravity. A repeated stress-resistant set of exercises after arthroscopy causes the bone to tighten and strengthen, which is why it is a vital part of rehabilitation. But this stress is usually too much after surgery.

Examples.

Examples of gravity resistance exercises include walking, jogging, hiking, climbing stairs, dancing, certain gymnastics, and everything else where the knees must support body weight. Swimming will not count; legs supported by water. Cycling is also not considered weighted, because the legs hang in the air. You can walk with a normal gait as soon as the pain and discomfort begin to subside. More intense exercises are often performed in the final stages of recovery.

Patience.

After surgery, you are usually advised to practice “carrying your body weight”, which means that you can put as much weight on your operated leg as you feel comfortable. However, most patients usually require a cane or crutch immediately after surgery to remove weight from the operated leg. Other obstacles to weight-related exercises include swelling, stiffness, lack of knee movement, and pain. Thus, most patients begin rehabilitation and use the basic set of exercises after arthroscopy.

Period of time.

Depending on the severity of the injury, recovery from standard surgery can occur after five weeks and up to six months. Normal actions and functions will gradually recover over time. If you had to undergo surgery for drilling or micro destruction, then you will start with only a quarter of your normal bearing capacity. A full drill of the patella can take four to nine months to fully recover because the newly restored cartilage should increase. Only at the end of these recovery periods is full load-bearing capacity restored.



The initial set of exercises after arthroscopy

It is important to work on the knee to restore normal range of motion. Basically, the patient works to easily straighten his knee completely (full extension) and bend it completely (full flexion). The patient can often restore full movement without another person causing the knee to bend, or a device to help the movement.

Exercises to restore the range of motion of the knee joint include stretching the knee joint, where the patient is sitting in a chair or lying on a sofa with a heel on a stool or several pillows and nothing under the knee. Then he pushes his leg to fully straighten his knee. To restore knee flexion, he can lie on the table and move his leg to his buttock. Using a belt or hands to pull it back may help. Further, the patient may try to sit on his heels.

In parallel with this, the patient must work to restore muscle strength in the entire lower limb in order to return to sport and work without restrictions.

At the beginning of the recovery process, exercises may include a direct leg lift. The patient lies on his back and slowly raises his leg with the knee straight, making several sets. Strengthening the quadriceps, lying face down and leg on a towel, and trying to straighten the knee can be helpful. Likewise, lying on your back with a bent knee and resting your heel on the table, lifting your hip joint, can help strengthen the hamstrings. Squats in half, without weight can also help. If you have access to the gym, you can use exercises such as squats and leg presses.

Tendon contraction.

No movement should occur in this exercise. Lie down or sit with your knees bent about 10 degrees. Pull the heels to the floor, tightening the muscle on the back of the thigh. Hold for five seconds, then rest.

Repeat 10 times.

Quadriceps contraction.

Lie on your stomach with a roll of towel under the ankle of your knee. Press the ankle into a towel. Your leg should straighten as much as possible. Hold for five seconds, then rest.

Repeat 10 times.

Raising a straight leg.

Lie on your back, bend your healthy knee and straighten your other leg. Slowly raise your foot by 15 cm, holding for five seconds. Continue to climb in increments of 15 cm.



Repeat 10 times.

Extras: Before starting, add weight to your ankle, starting with 450 gr. weight and building up to 2.5 kg of weight in 4 weeks.

Exercise the buttocks.

Lie on your back, tighten the muscles of the buttocks. Hold tight, five seconds, then rest.

Repeat 10 times.

An elongated leg rises while standing.

Hold yourself against something, and lift the involved leg forward, keeping the knee straight. Return to the starting position.

To increase the load: before starting, add weight to your ankle, starting at 450 g. weight and building up to 2.5 kg of weight in 4 weeks.

An intermediate set of exercises after arthroscopy

Expansion of the knee joint on the back.

Lie on your back with a roller under the knee.

Straighten the knee joint (the roll is still supported) and hold it for five seconds. Slowly return to the starting position.

Repeat 10 times.

To increase the load: before starting, add weight to your ankle, starting at 450 g. weight and building up to 2.5 kg of weight in 4 weeks.

Raising a straight leg.

Lie on your back, bent at the knee. Straighten the repairing knee with quadriceps muscle contraction.

Subsequently, slowly raise the leg, about 30 cm from the floor. Lay it slowly on the floor and rest.

Perform five sets of 10 repetitions.

Extras: Before starting, add weight to your ankle, starting with 450 gr. weight and building up to 2.5 kg of weight in 4 weeks.

Partial squat, with a chair.

Hold on to a sturdy chair or stand with legs 15 to 30 cm from a chair or stand. Keeping your back straight, bend your knees slowly. Do not fall below 90 degrees. Hold for 5-10 seconds ten times. Rise slowly. Have a rest.

Four-headed stretching, stand.

Standing with the knee involved, gently pull the heel towards the buttocks, feels a stretch in the front of the leg. Hold for 5 seconds ten times.

An advanced set of exercises after arthroscopy

Bent knee, in part, with one leg.

Standing supporting himself against the back of a chair. Bend a non-painful leg; for balance, stand on your toes as needed. Slowly lower yourself while holding your foot. Do not overdo this exercise. Straighten to the starting position. Relax. And so several times.

Standing forward.

Steps forward 15 cm high footrest or onto the platform leading with your foot involved. Go down, return to the starting position. And so several times.

Standing sideways

Stand 15 cm on the elevated platform leading with your foot involved. Go down, return to the starting position. Increase the platform as the strength increases. And so several times.

Expansion of the knee joint while sitting.

Sitting on a chair, place your heel on another chair. Now straighten your knee, hold for 5 seconds, then to the starting position.

Repeat 10 times.

Stretching tendons on the back.

Lie on your back. Pull your thigh with your hands, grab the thigh just above the knee. Slowly straighten your knee until you feel pressure behind the knee. Hold for 5 seconds ten times, then relax.

If you do not feel this stretch, bend your hip a little more and repeat.

Stretching tendons lying on your back.

Lie down next to the doorway with your leg extended. Put your heel on the wall. The closer you are to the wall, the more intense the stretching.

Bending your knee, move your hips to the wall. Now begin to straighten your knee. When you feel tightness behind the knee, hold for 5 seconds ten times, then relax.

Exercise bike.

If you have access to the exercise bike, adjust the seat height so that the lower part of your leg touches the pedal and makes a complete revolution. As you get stronger, slowly increase the tension on the bike.

Pedal for 10 minutes a day. Add 1 minute per day until you pedal for 20 minutes per day.

When moving on an exercise bike after arthroscopy, you may experience slight discomfort in the knee, this is considered normal. You should not experience pain while cycling after surgery. If you are in pain, stop cycling and consult your surgeon. If you continue through your pain, you may damage your knee.

Walking.

Walking – excellent physical activity in the middle stages of postoperative recovery (after 2 weeks).

Run.

Your doctor may recommend that you avoid exercising during the postoperative period to protect your knee. The duration of the restriction will depend on what type of procedure you had. For example, if you had meniscus repair, your limitation would be different than if you had torn cartilage. Your doctor will talk with you about when you can safely gradually resume your current activities and apply a set of exercises after arthroscopy.

Read this also:

You May also like this:




0 Comments

Leave a Reply